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The Book of Life

Probably common knowledge by now, but I grew up in a Texas border town. I was raised in Mexican culture as much as American. I don't typically miss home. Lots of reasons for that. The first few years I moved out to Boston, I would get wicked cravings for the food, but I eventually got past that. (Not that I'm over the food, but I've learned to live without it until my yearly Christmas visit). Now while I may not be in any hurry to go back and visit, occasionally a movie will take me back. That I'm fine with. If done well enough, I'll even welcome that quick trip. Book of Life was one of those rare excursions.

Even from the trailers, I could see how absolutely beautiful the animation was. My family never celebrated Dia De Los Muertos, but its associated art and decorations were all around every fall. I was excited to see those intricate designs and bright colors on the screen. The calaveras and papel picado seemed pulled right from my childhood. And then during the film, it was things like the characters names and nicknames, the phrases, the accents, the subjects of their small talk that really felt like I'd made it back to the border.

As far as the story goes, it was your typical childrens animated film. Nothing too groundbreaking there, but the color and culture were plenty to carry it thru. The voice cast (especially our lead, Diego Luna) also had an energy and charisma that permeated the screen. There was a fun mix of original and reimaged classic songs. Not too many so as to not overpower the film, but just enough to tug at the heart.

I may not wanna go back home often, but I was certainly happy with this kind of trip

The Book of Life - \m/ \m/ \m/ \m/
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